Designjunction review at new home Kings Cross Granary square

Designjunction review at new home Kings Cross Granary square

Last weekend I attended Designjunction at it’s new long-term home at Kings Cross Granary square. Designjunction takes place over four days, was launched in 2011 by industry experts and draws on the worlds most renowned brands and leading experts in architecture and interior design.

The show is a mixture of pop-up stands/shops, design led installations, interactive features and workshops. Designjunction is open to the trade and public and because of this it manages to

‘strike the balance between creative and commercial’.

The show was split into 3 sections – The Canopy (homewares, accessories and included the pop-up shops), Cubitt House (furniture, lighting & trade) and Cubitt park (furniture, accessories, materials and trade). The show is small and compact felt fresh, cutting edge and inspirational. Designjunction has a contemporary biased compared to a show such as Decorex which is aimed towards modern classic design.

One colour palette was particularly strong this season for both hard and soft products. The combination of tomato red or burgundy with forest green, mustard, dusty pink, and pale blue seemed refreshingly new yet  very commercial. For the more confident consumer,  tomato red combined with mustard, forest green and pale blue would be preferred – as demonstrated by designer Daniel Emma simple yet striking pop-up shop. Alternatively, the combination of burgundy with the other highlights offered a new twist on the classic autumnal palette.  The &New furniture stand was a masterclass in colour. The combination of these colours could be seen on hard surfaces such as chairs, lighting and home accessories but was also on upholstery and home textiles.

 

The Monochrome Series by Beatrice Larkin
Steel and upholstered chair by Daniel - Emma

Monochrome was still visible throughout the show for all products but there was a definite resurgence of colour. Not surprising, being a contemporary show, the main pattern trends were geometric and graphic. They were however in no way simple but were intricate, complex and made interesting use of the colour palette of the show but also evident in monochrome.

Another pattern or emerging texture was the use of terrazzo, jesmonite or similar which was seen on vases, clocks, worktops, and shelving. A beautiful example was the vessels Olivia Aspinall had made in collaboration with Ornamental Grace.

 

Olivia Aspinall Studio & Ornamental Grace collaboration

In summary – an inspiring show with lots of inspiration from a great line up of brands – my favourites being Deadgood, Adentro, Bestuhl and Room-9.

 

Did you visit?  What did you take away?

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